Beyond the Schoolhouse: Digging Deeper Coverage

4/14/2021
LA TimesBlack students in 14 L.A. County school districts face serious equity barriers, study finds
Black students in Los Angeles County continue to face a multitude of barriers to an equitable education, including concentrated poverty, high suspension rates and housing insecurity, a UCLA report released Wednesday found. Researchers focused on 14 school districts in the county that serve at least 800 Black students to understand how various factors are leaving behind Black children, particularly those considered vulnerable. Read more >

4/14/2021
KTLA 5Black students in 14 Los Angeles County school districts face major equity barriers: UCLA study
Black students in Los Angeles County continue to face a multitude of barriers to an equitable education, including concentrated poverty, high suspension rates and housing insecurity, a UCLA report released Wednesday found. Researchers focused on 14 school districts in the county that serve at least 800 Black students to understand how various factors are leaving behind Black children, particularly those considered vulnerable. Read more >

4/14/2021
UCLA NewsroomResearch shows COVID-19 has likely worsened inequalities for Black students in L.A. County
A new report from the UCLA Center for the Transformation of Schools examines the relationship between educational outcomes and social, health and environmental factors of Black students in Los Angeles County. The research makes it clear that a disproportionate number of Black children in L.A. County reside in neighborhoods where poverty is concentrated, educational enrichment opportunities are limited, environmental hazards are severe, and resources are lacking. Read more >

4/14/2021
KNX RadioStanley Johnson Jr, Lead-author of the Beyond the Schoolhouse: Digging Deeper report discusses findings Listen >


4/14/2021
EdSourceAs they reopen, schools should focus on inequities affecting Black students, UCLA study finds
As campuses reopen, schools in Los Angeles County should devote special attention and resources to Black students, who are more likely to have been adversely affected by the pandemic and a host of other factors related to inequity, according to new research by the UCLA Center for the Transformation of Schools. Shifting demographics in Los Angeles County have resulted in more Black students living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty, higher pollution rates and poor health outcomes for residents, researchers found. The pandemic ushered in further hardships. Read more >

4/15/2021
PHYSCOVID-19 has likely worsened inequality for Black students in LA County
he UCLA Center for the Transformation of Schools today released a new report examining the relationship between educational outcomes and social, health and environmental factors of Black students in 14 school districts, serving 800 Black students or more in Los Angeles County. Together, these school districts serve more than two-thirds of Black students in the region. The findings spanned neighborhoods from the northern reaches of the Antelope Valley to Long Beach. Read more >

4/15/2021
Patch Los AngelesBlack students in LA Schools Face Challenges Worsened by the Pandemic
Historical disadvantages facing Black students in Los Angeles County have only worsened during the pandemic, according to a UCLA study released this week. The study, which examined the links between educational achievement and social, health, and environmental factors, found that a disproportionate number of Black children in Los Angeles County live in neighborhoods where poverty is concentrated, educational enrichment opportunities are limited, environmental hazards are severe, and resources are lacking. Read more >

4/14/2021
Press Release: New UCLA Research Digs Deeper into Social Challenges Facing Black Students in LA County to Inform COVID-19 Recovery      
Read the press release >

10/16/2020
Press Release: New Research from UCLA Center for the Transformation of Schools Details Crisis of Student Homelessness in California
Read the press release >

State of Crisis Coverage

10/21/2020
Los Angeles Times: California’s homeless students could fill Dodger Stadium 5 times, study finds
There were at least 269,000 K-12 students in California experiencing homelessness at the end of the 2018-19 school year — enough children and teens to fill Dodger Stadium five times over — and that number was likely a gross underestimate, a UCLA report said. In the face of pandemic-related job losses and economic instability, researchers believe that the number of homeless students in California is likely to surge, according to the study from UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools. Read more >

10/20/2020
NBC 4: UCLA study reports staggering rise in student homelessness in California
According to the report, “State of Crisis, Dismantling of Student Homelessness in California,” the number of students experiencing homelessness in the state has increased by nearly 50% in the past decade. Given the disruption and economic fallout of COVID-19, the report’s authors contend the number of students now experiencing homelessness is likely higher. Read more >

10/20/2020
Los Angeles Daily News: Nearly 270,000 K-12 students are homeless in California, says UCLA study Nearly 270,000 kindergarten through 12th students in California experienced homelessness during the 2018-2019 school year, according to a report released by UCLA. The report issued Monday by the UCLA Center for the Transformation of Schools also found that one in five community college students, one in 10 California State University students and one in 20 University of California students experienced homelessness during the year. Read more >

10/20/2020
Richmond Standard: UCLA study reports staggering rise in student homelessness in California Almost 270,000 K-12 students in California experienced homelessness during the 2018-2019 academic year, an increase of nearly 50 percent in the past decade, according to new report from the UCLA Center for the Transformation of Schools, which analyzed data from the California Department of Education. In Contra Costa, the number of students experiencing homelessness nearly doubled over the last two academic years, from 1,705 in 2017-18, which was about .95 percent of the 178,060 total enrolled students in the county, to 3,062 in 2018-19, or about 1.7 percent of 175,040 enrolled, the study showed. Read more >

10/20/2020
Ed Source: California schools see big jump in number of homeless students
California’s escalating cost of living has led to a 48% surge in the state’s homeless student population over the past decade, according to new research released today by researchers at UCLA. Almost 270,000 students in K-12 schools lacked stable housing in 2018-19, numbers that almost certainly have grown since the pandemic and economic downturn began last spring, researchers said. “We knew the numbers would be up, but we were surprised at the scope and severity of the crisis,” said Joseph Bishop, director of UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools, which compiled the report. “Looking at these numbers was really a ‘wow’ moment.” Read more >

10/20/2020
CBS LA: California has over a quarter-million homeless students, report finds
Just over 4% of all K-12 students in California were homeless during the 2018-19 school year, according to a report released Monday by UCLA. The report by the UCLA Center for Transformation of Schools found that there were 269,269 homeless students in California during the 2018-19 school year, which made up 4.3% of the entire student population. Read more >

10/20/2020
SFGate: California Schools See A Big Jump In Number of Homeless Students
California’s escalating cost of living has led to a 48 percent surge in the state’s homeless student population over the past decade, according to new research released Tuesday by researchers at UCLA. Almost 270,000 students in K-12 schools lacked stable housing in 2018-19, numbers that almost certainly have grown since the pandemic and economic downturn began last spring, researchers said. Read more >

10/21/2020
La Opinion: Latinos lideron el numero de estudiantes sin hogar
El pasado mes de junio, Jacqueline Robles, de 21 años, celebró su graduación de la Universidad Estatal de California en Long Beach (CSULB), donde obtuvo una licenciatura en administración de empresas. Actualmente est asistiendo a la Universidad de California en Los Ángeles (UCLA) para obtener una maestría, la cual espera culminar en dos años. Las personas que no la conocen poco imaginarían que Robles ha sobresalido exitosamente pese a que casi toda su vida ha estado con la falta de un hogar estable. La estudiante dijo que creció con su madre, quien padecía problemas mentales y abuso de drogas. A los 5 años el sistema de cuidado infantil del condado de Los Ángeles se la llevó. Vivió por un año en un hogar de crianza y a los 6 años se la entregaron a su abuela materna. Leer más >

10/21/2020
Forbes: Number of Homeless Students in California Could Fill Dodgers Stadium 5 Times, Study Finds
Though Los Angeles’ Dodger stadium will be empty when World Series game two kicks off Wednesday night, a startling new report from UCLA found that the stadium could be filled five times over by the number of homeless students in the state of California— a number only expected to increase due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Read more >

10/21/2020
CBS: There are enough homeless students in California to fill Dodger’s stadium 5 times, study finds
There were 269,269 K-12 students experiencing homelessness in California at the end of the 2018-2019 school year, according to a new study from UCLA. That’s enough students to fill the entire Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles about five times. The report, released Wednesday by UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools, found the number of homeless students has risen by 50% in the last 10 years. With the number of homeless students surpassing 269,000, researchers hope the report will highlight the inadequacy of current programs for homeless youth and emphasize additional funding for programs and new policies on both the federal and state level. Read more >

10/22/2020
Rochester First: There are enough homeless students in California to fill Dodger’s stadium 5 times
There were 269,269 K-12 students experiencing homelessness in California at the end of the 2018-2019 school year, according to a new study from UCLA. That’s enough students to fill the entire Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles about five times. The report, released Wednesday by UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools, found the number of homeless students has risen by 50 percent in the last 10 years. With the number of homeless students surpassing 269,000, researchers hope the report will highlight the inadequacy of current programs for homeless youth and emphasize additional funding for programs and new policies on both the federal and state level. Read more >

11/23/2020
CalMatters: Crisis of rising student homelessness worthy of immediate action
During the COVID-19 pandemic, little attention has been paid to the plight of students without any homes or unstable housing. Our research at UCLA shows that more than 269,000 K-12 students are experiencing homelessness in California, the highest number in the country, and a figure so large it could fill Dodger Stadium five times over. Lawmakers at every level of government have a role to play in tackling the student homelessness crisis, especially the more than 5,000 California school board members who govern more than 1,000 school districts and county offices of education. Student homelessness has increased by 48% in California over the past decade. Seven out of 10 California students grappling with homelessness are Latinx and a disproportionate number of Black youth find themselves in similar circumstances. Read more >

1/12/2021
Colorado Boulevard: Homelessness: One of Pasadena Unified’s Many Challenges This Year
Here in the Pasadena Unified School District, there are 15,316 students and 686 of them are homeless or housing-insecure (living with relatives, friends). That’s quite a number. Homeless and housing insecure students have higher rates of absenteeism, lower graduation rates, and have greater needs for mental health services. Academic success is best achieved when a student has a stable home and a quiet space to work and think. For a homeless child the public school can provide stability in addition to a desk, daily nutritious food, after-school programs, and staff to provide counseling. Now we have the COVID pandemic which is deepening the problems of a homeless child. What is PUSD doing? Educating the whole child is a policy in PUSD. In fact, Pasadena is the first district in California to have a stand-alone mental health policy. Read more >

2/19/2021
Teen Vogue: Homeless Students Lack Basic Needs, Support During COVID-19 Pandemic
Jennifer Friend, former corporate lawyer and now the CEO of Project Hope Alliance, an Orange County, California-based nonprofit dedicated to assisting children who are experiencing homelessness, remembers the moment last March when she realized everything was about to change. She received a notification on her phone that schools would be closing and all students needed to be picked up immediately. “Wow, so now I just do school over the internet?” Friend’s daughter, a high school student, said when she got in the car. Friend’s mind immediately turned to students living in motels, cars, or shelters, she tells Teen Vogue. “I thought, Oh my gosh, all these kids… How on earth are they going to be able to access their education?” It’s a situation Friend is more intimately familiar with than even some of her colleagues: She spent part of her adolescence without a permanent address, moving between motels with her parents and siblings. Read more >

Beyond the Schoolhouse Coverage

10/9/2019
KPCC Take Two – Interview with Pedro Noguera
A UCLA report on black youth in LA County explores a range of challenges many K through 12 students face that negatively affect outcomes in school and beyond. Among them: environmental contamination – asthma rates for black children in LA County are almost three times higher than for white children. Food insecurity and homelessness can factor in too. The report makes several policy suggestions to tackle the problems. Take Two talks about it with Pedro Noguera, co-author of the report and a professor at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Listen >

10/9/2019
Los Angeles Times – Only half of California students meet English standards, and fewer meet math standards, test scores show
“’We don’t have high-quality preschool available; the same supports that you see in the affluent, suburban and private schools, you don’t see in the public schools serving poor kids,’ said UCLA education professor Pedro Noguera.” Read more >

10/10/2019
Education Dive – Study: Black students face ‘accumulation of disadvantage’
“While this study is focused on the Los Angeles area, national studies have also confirmed poverty significantly contributes to the U.S. achievement gap. The UCLA study suggests that the “accumulation of disadvantage” that black students face in particular must be addressed in and outside of school in order to improve educational and developmental outcomes.” Read more >

10/9/2019
UCLA Ampersand – UCLA Study: Black Youth in LA County Face an “Accumulation of Disadvantage”
“Black youth in Los Angeles County face an accumulation of disadvantage, undermining their academic, social and economic success and placing them at greater risk of structural disenfranchisement — not in school, not working and ensnared in the criminal justice system, according to a new study Beyond the Schoolhouse: Overcoming Challenges & Expanding Opportunity for Black Youth in Los Angeles County, released today by researchers at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies.” Read more >

10/12/2019
EdSource – Tackling lagging math scores; combating adversity for African American students
“Providing insights into the lagging education performance of many African American students, a new UCLA report titled Beyond the Schoolhouse also came out this week. We interview Tyrone Howard, a professor of education at UCLA who co-authored the report. It paints a compelling picture of the many adverse factors in and outside of school affecting the 109,000 African American students in Los Angeles County, and urges a comprehensive approach to overcome the obstacles.” Listen >

10/14/2019
Black youth in Los Angeles County face an ‘accumulation of disadvantage’
“Black youth in Los Angeles County face an accumulation of disadvantage, undermining their academic, social and economic success and placing them at greater risk of structural disenfranchisement — not in school, not working and ensnared in the criminal justice system, according to a new study Beyond the Schoolhouse: Overcoming Challenges & Expanding Opportunity for Black Youth in Los Angeles County, released today by researchers at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies.” Read more >


What Are We Afraid Of? Why Silencing Asian Americans Is No Longer Tolerated

by Peter T. Keo
October 31, 2018 – Teachers College Record
This commentary argues that there is a lack of nuance on both sides of the Asian-American affirmative action debate. The author presents two nuances to stimulate further discussion aimed at dismantling a larger project of structural racism in which Asian Americans have been silenced and invisible.

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Podcast: The Bright Side of Masculinity: How Gender Roles are Changing in 2018

Take a listen to our CTS Director Dr. Pedro Noguera discuss with Dr. Michael Kimmel, founder of the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities at Stony Brook University, what it means to be a man in 2018 and how gender roles are changing among younger generations.

Listen

 

Blogpost: DACA And The American Dream

By Pedro Noguera
09/09/2017 – Huffington Post
I met Miguel in 2006. I was visiting his school in the South Bronx and was very impressed by what it was accomplishing. Like Miguel, most of the students at this school were labeled Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFE), and many were undocumented. At most schools, students like these drop out in droves, but at this school over 90 percent graduate (in four or five years) having passed six or more Regents exams. This includes the English exam, which is a truly remarkable feat since many of these kids were not literate in their native language when they arrived.

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Report: Taking Deeper Learning to Scale

By Pedro Noguera
September 2017 – Learning Policy Institute
For some time now, it has been evident that the policies pursued by the United States to elevate the academic performance of students, particularly those who are most economically disadvantaged, have not produced the results that were promised or hoped for. Lack of progress and growing opposition to high-stakes testing have led a growing number of educators and policy advocates to conclude that education policies and the strategies used to help underperforming schools and to promote student achievement must change. Some have called for a more deliberate focus on creating conditions that promote highly effective teaching and that support more deeply engaged learning.

Download the Report